Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Power Pink

Important diamonds mark milestones both public and private. Pink diamonds desirability and value has soared in recent years. Still very few of these feminine rarities reach the market each year. 

Here are a couple of much celebrated pinkies that each point to one special person and the life she's lived; Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain.

Note the super sized Steinmetz Jubilee Pink Diamond, so named to commemorate the 60th year reign of Queen Elizabeth II, which occurred in 2012.
35.60 cts Steinmetz Forevermark Jubilee Pink Diamond


The sumptuous stone was recovered from South Africa's Saxendrift mine. Geology has a lot to do with a fancy color diamond's eventual hue. These include trace elements of other minerals that find their way into the lattice structure of a crystal during formation. Natural radiation, which is abundant in certain terrain, can also impart color to the crystal. 

Note the trigonal configurations apparent in the pink rough seen here. Pink diamonds on the whole tend to be found with many inclusions, and those inclusions tend to be darker.

While consumers are just now beginning to familiarize themselves with the concept of colored diamonds, they are not new by a long shot. A young princess Elizabeth (now Queen Elizabeth II) received an extraordinary pink diamond as a wedding gift in 1947.

The uncut rough weighed 54.5 carats and was cut into a 23.6 round brilliant and later set into a brooch by Cartier. It is still considered to be the finest quality pink diamond.



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