Thursday, November 4, 2010

The Cut's The Thing

Diamonds have traveled a long and winding road to their current status as Most Favored Sparkly Rock. Diamonds were first mined in ancient India--until some were conveniently spied scattered around Brazil. Later Africa became the hot spot to harvest the coveted stones.

And all along the way, cutters busied themselves with figuring out how to improve on a good thing. With every new cutting design, their sparkle improved and they flaunted more of their potential.

Versions of the round standard brilliant cut have held their rank as the most popular shape throughout the centuries. And for good reason; the round shape allows for terrific scintillation.
DIAMOND SHAPE CAN PLACE IT IN A CERTAIN TIME PERIOD
During their evolution in the 19th century, round diamonds were polished into what is referred to as the Old European Cut. This cut was the most advanced design pattern of its day. The round shape stone is readily distinguished by its small table, heavy and tall crown and a nice big open culet winking out at you from the center of the table crown.

TO CUT OR NOT TO CUT
Years back, most older diamond cuts fell prey to re-cutting as the modern cutting patterns handled light more efficiently and with dramatic results. So these early diamond shapes disappeared and fewer of these original cuts appeared on the market. Today we re-think the need to routinely re-cut all older diamonds---because their value is also in their charm and history. With many of them having disappeared under the albeit masterful hands of the polisher---they can be called rare as well.

APPRECIATING DIAMOND'S HISTORY
We think diamonds should be appreciated for what they are; their original shape allows them to be placed in context to a time long past. When older cuts are exquisite like the special Old European Cut diamond we found at Fay Cullen, Inc., we say----leave it alone and enjoy the compliments.

Photos: Courtesy of Fay Cullen Inc., Old European Cut Diamond Engagement Ring

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